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This is a hand from last year’s PokerStar’s Caribbean Adventure where I was commentating. I will share with you a particularly sweet hand played by Daniel Negreanu. Daniel made it clear that he had been working hard on his game, and this hand clearly illustrates that to be the case.



I was recently recounted a hand from a $1/$3 no-limit hold’em cash game that illustrates a few flaws in the average small stake player’s strategy. With a $700 effective stack, Hero raised to $20 from second position at a nine-handed table with KQ



I was recently told about a hand played by an amateur poker player in a $500 buy-in tournament that illustrates a common mistake that many players make on a regular basis. With blinds at 1,000/2,000 with a 200 ante, everyone folded to the player on the button who called 2,000 out of his 80,000 stack. This player is known to call with a wide range from late position, hoping to flop well. The small blind, an unknown player with 50,000, also called. Our Hero, with a 30,000 stack, decided to check in the big blind with 42.



I was recently told about a hand from a $1/$1 no-limit cash game that illustrates a few mistakes that many amateur players make on a regular basis. The first two players at a nine-handed table called $1 and then the Hero in third position raised to $25 out of his $425 effective stack with 9-9.



I was recently told about a hand from a $1/$2 no-limit cash game that illustrates two errors that many amateur players make on a regular basis. A generally tight player raised to $5 out of his $200 stack from first position at a 7-handed table. Another reasonable player called from the hijack seat (two to the right of the button). Hero called with 99 from the small blind.


Hand Analysis
D&B MAGAZINE
Strategy
D&B MAGAZINE

While most of your profit in soft or small buy-in tournaments will come from getting full value from your strong hands, occasionally you will need to run a well-timed bluff. I played a hand in the recent $1,000 buy-in WPT side event at Borgata that illustrates this point.



The following hand took place early in Day 1 of the $3,500 buy-in Borgata Poker Open WPT main event. I was pleased to find myself at a table that should have been quite good for me because my opponents were clearly playing in a blatantly straightforward manner. Despite this, I found myself down to 24,000 from my initial 30,000 chip stack, mostly due to making a strong, but second best hands a few times in a row.



The following hand took place in a $1,000 buy-in World Poker Tour side event. The tournament just started and everyone had about 4,500 chips with 25/25 blinds. I raised to 75 from the cutoff seat with KJ and only the small blind, a 50-year-old recreational local player, called.


Hand Analysis
D&B MAGAZINE
Strategy
D&B MAGAZINE

I recently went to the Bahamas to play a major tournament series and as soon as I landed, I jumped into a fun-looking $10/$20 no-limit game. After about 30 minutes, I won $2,500 from an overly aggressive kid when he three barrel bluffed in a 3-bet pot and I didn’t fold a marginal overpair. He seemed to be tilted, which is always nice.



Conserving my Stack in the WSOP Main Event

This interesting hand took place in the 2018 $10,000 buy-in World Series of Poker Main Event in Las Vegas. Around 30% of the players who started the tournament remained in contention. The blinds were 1,000/2,000 with a 300 ante. Everyone folded around to me in the hijack seat. I raised with AQ to 4,500. The Button, a loose aggressive kid, and the Big Blind, a splashy, straightforward player who typically overvalues his marginal made hands, called.


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