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If there was no betting in poker and players were forced to go all-in every hand, the expected value for each player would be their hand equity times the pot.

Ev=Eq*Pot

Example: In a gambling HU game each player has to ante $100, and there is no future betting, Player1 gets dealt 44, and player gets 98 What is each player’s expected payoff?



Slow Playing Gone Wrong

I was recently told about a hand that illustrates why slow playing is such a bad strategy. In a $2/$5 cash game, everyone folded around to a really tight old guy who limped for $5 out of his $1,300 effective stack. Hero decided to raise to $15 with AA



Hand Analysis From WPT Borgata Winter Poker Open

You’re sitting in the WPT Borgata Winter Poker Open. Many players are raise/calling goofy hands out of position. 5 4, K T. You haven’t had many hands go your way.

You get dealt Jacks UTG+2. The blinds are 250/500. You open to 1700.

It gets folded around to a Latino gentleman in the big blind. He has played 30% of the hands during the day, but he limps generally. He likes to call preflop when someone else raises, and then calls when someone squeezes.

He looks at your raise and asks the dealer quietly, “how much is it?”

He then stamps out 5800 and stares you down.

You have 22K in your stack.

What do you do?

(Actually come up with an answer before you scroll down. It makes the learning process more fun and memorable).


If you enjoy the full article you may be interested in Alexander Fitzgerald’s new book which is currently available for pre-order (paperback or ebook). It will be sent to you as soon as it publishes: Excelling at Live Poker



Overplaying a marginal pair

I was recently told about a hand that illustrates a few costly mistakes that many amateur poker players make on a regular basis. In a $1/$2 no-limit cash game, all seven players limped around to our Hero in the small blind who raised to $8 out of his $150 effective stack with 9-9.



In this series of PokerSnowie hand history reviews, Byron Jacobs and Jonathan Little discuss an interesting spot that Byron played that Snowie disagrees with. Jonathan usually figures out why Snowie chose its play, but even he is sometimes stumped.

This week, Byron and Jonathan discuss rivering trips.



Avoiding a Cooler with Pocket Jacks

I recently played a fun hand from a $1,500 buy-in side event that I think is incredibly educational. With blinds at 400/800 with a 100 ante, a loose, aggressive player raised to 1,800 out of his 30,000 stack from third position at a nine-handed table. I found pocket Jacks on the button and 3-bet (re-raised) to 4,400 out of my 25,000 stack.



In this series of PokerSnowie hand history reviews, Byron Jacobs and Jonathan Little discuss an interesting spot that Byron played that Snowie disagrees with. Jonathan usually figures out why Snowie chose its play, but even he is sometimes stumped.

This week, Byron and Jonathan discuss playing a vulnerable top pair with a decent kicker.



In this series of PokerSnowie hand history reviews, Byron Jacobs and Jonathan Little discuss an interesting spot that Byron played that Snowie disagrees with. Jonathan usually figures out why Snowie chose its play, but even he is sometimes stumped.

This week, Byron and Jonathan discuss calling off with only a marginal over pair.



Slow Playing is Risky

Today I am going to share with you a hand I played last year in a $1,000 side event at the Hard Rock in Hollywood Florida. Up until this point, my table had been fairly tight and passive. No one was too crazy.

Everyone folded to me in second position at a nine-handed table and I raised to 375 out of my 9,000 effective stack at 75/150 with Ks-Qs. The cutoff and button both called. The blinds folded.



In this series of PokerSnowie hand history reviews, Byron Jacobs and Jonathan Little discuss an interesting spot that Byron played that Snowie disagrees with. Jonathan usually figures out why Snowie chose its play, but even he is sometimes stumped.

This week, Byron and Jonathan discuss calling an over-bet with middle pair.


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