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In this series of PokerSnowie hand history reviews, Byron Jacobs and Jonathan Little discuss an interesting spot that Byron played that Snowie disagrees with. Jonathan usually figures out why Snowie chose its play, but even he is sometimes stumped.

This week, Byron and Jonathan discuss rivering trips.



Avoiding a Cooler with Pocket Jacks

I recently played a fun hand from a $1,500 buy-in side event that I think is incredibly educational. With blinds at 400/800 with a 100 ante, a loose, aggressive player raised to 1,800 out of his 30,000 stack from third position at a nine-handed table. I found pocket Jacks on the button and 3-bet (re-raised) to 4,400 out of my 25,000 stack.



In this series of PokerSnowie hand history reviews, Byron Jacobs and Jonathan Little discuss an interesting spot that Byron played that Snowie disagrees with. Jonathan usually figures out why Snowie chose its play, but even he is sometimes stumped.

This week, Byron and Jonathan discuss playing a vulnerable top pair with a decent kicker.



In this series of PokerSnowie hand history reviews, Byron Jacobs and Jonathan Little discuss an interesting spot that Byron played that Snowie disagrees with. Jonathan usually figures out why Snowie chose its play, but even he is sometimes stumped.

This week, Byron and Jonathan discuss calling off with only a marginal over pair.



Slow Playing is Risky

Today I am going to share with you a hand I played last year in a $1,000 side event at the Hard Rock in Hollywood Florida. Up until this point, my table had been fairly tight and passive. No one was too crazy.

Everyone folded to me in second position at a nine-handed table and I raised to 375 out of my 9,000 effective stack at 75/150 with Ks-Qs. The cutoff and button both called. The blinds folded.



In this series of PokerSnowie hand history reviews, Byron Jacobs and Jonathan Little discuss an interesting spot that Byron played that Snowie disagrees with. Jonathan usually figures out why Snowie chose its play, but even he is sometimes stumped.

This week, Byron and Jonathan discuss calling an over-bet with middle pair.



I was recently told about a hand that illustrates a clear mistake that some amateurs make while working to improve their strategies. Our particular Hero was working on making thin value bets when this hand took place.

With blinds at 400/800, a loose, passive player limped from first position out of his 40,000 effective stack. Another loose passive player limped from second position. Our Hero decided to call from the hijack seat with Ks-Tc.



In this series of PokerSnowie hand history reviews, Byron Jacobs and Jonathan Little discuss an interesting spot that Byron played that Snowie disagrees with. Jonathan usually figures out why Snowie chose its play, but even he is sometimes stumped.

This week, Byron and Jonathan discuss how to play a marginal made hand that rivers the nuts.



Don't Be a Calling Station

I was recently told about a poker hand that illustrates a costly mistake that many amateur players make on a regular basis. In a $1/$2 nine-handed cash game with very deep $600 effective stacks, the player in first position limped and Hero limped behind with 6-6.

Hero’s limp is perfectly fine, given the deep stacks. Even if someone yet to act makes a reasonably sized raise, Hero can easily call due to his excellent pot odds. Raising to about $10 may have a bit of merit if it will usually get the pot heads-up, but that will not be the case in most small stakes cash games.



In this series of PokerSnowie hand history reviews, Byron Jacobs and Jonathan Little discuss an interesting spot that Byron played that Snowie disagrees with. Jonathan usually figures out why Snowie chose its play, but even he is sometimes stumped.

This week, Byron and Jonathan discuss when you should continue barreling off when a draw arrives.


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