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Slow Playing is Risky

Today I am going to share with you a hand I played last year in a $1,000 side event at the Hard Rock in Hollywood Florida. Up until this point, my table had been fairly tight and passive. No one was too crazy.

Everyone folded to me in second position at a nine-handed table and I raised to 375 out of my 9,000 effective stack at 75/150 with Ks-Qs. The cutoff and button both called. The blinds folded.



In this series of PokerSnowie hand history reviews, Byron Jacobs and Jonathan Little discuss an interesting spot that Byron played that Snowie disagrees with. Jonathan usually figures out why Snowie chose its play, but even he is sometimes stumped.

This week, Byron and Jonathan discuss calling an over-bet with middle pair.



Turning Pro - Life's a Gamble Excerpt

The only difference between a winner and a loser is character.

~ “Nick the Greek” Dandolas

After the Army and the six-month stint with my dad, I moved back to Fayetteville, NC, worked as a military sales rep, and got married to a local girl, Pam Sharpe. I taught ballroom dancing part time, but I also managed to find some home poker games.



I was recently told about a hand that illustrates a clear mistake that some amateurs make while working to improve their strategies. Our particular Hero was working on making thin value bets when this hand took place.

With blinds at 400/800, a loose, passive player limped from first position out of his 40,000 effective stack. Another loose passive player limped from second position. Our Hero decided to call from the hijack seat with Ks-Tc.



Dr. Patricia Cardner explains the keys to staying motivated.



In this series of PokerSnowie hand history reviews, Byron Jacobs and Jonathan Little discuss an interesting spot that Byron played that Snowie disagrees with. Jonathan usually figures out why Snowie chose its play, but even he is sometimes stumped.

This week, Byron and Jonathan discuss how to play a marginal made hand that rivers the nuts.



Poker is War - Advanced Concepts in No-Limit Hold'em Excerpt

People say chess has a lot of similarities to war. I’d say poker has more of them. A war is a conflict fought with imperfect information. Nothing is hidden in chess; however, there’s a lot of imperfect information in poker. If you view poker as a battle, the similarities are astounding.



Don't Be a Calling Station

I was recently told about a poker hand that illustrates a costly mistake that many amateur players make on a regular basis. In a $1/$2 nine-handed cash game with very deep $600 effective stacks, the player in first position limped and Hero limped behind with 6-6.

Hero’s limp is perfectly fine, given the deep stacks. Even if someone yet to act makes a reasonably sized raise, Hero can easily call due to his excellent pot odds. Raising to about $10 may have a bit of merit if it will usually get the pot heads-up, but that will not be the case in most small stakes cash games.



Introduction to the Squeeze Play

The Squeeze Play should be a crucial part of your pre-flop strategy. Qui Nguyen used it on Hand #70 in From Vietnam to Vegas! The Final Table was six-handed at that point, and the blinds were $400K/$800K with a $100K ante. Second to act, Michael Ruane opened for $1.8M. Kenny Hallaert called on the button. Qui was the big blind with Qs-6c. We had seen Michael Ruane opening light from early position – he had already opened with Kc-5c and 9h-7h earlier that day. Qui decided to re-raise to $5.9M, and took it down.



In this series of PokerSnowie hand history reviews, Byron Jacobs and Jonathan Little discuss an interesting spot that Byron played that Snowie disagrees with. Jonathan usually figures out why Snowie chose its play, but even he is sometimes stumped.

This week, Byron and Jonathan discuss when you should continue barreling off when a draw arrives.


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